Heal Your Skin with Joylin Naturals Organic Skin Care

I had the pleasure of trying out some Joylin Naturals products that one of the founders, Lindsey sent me. This company uses organic and natural products and specializes in helping people with skin problems find products to help, nourish and soothe their skin.


I got to have a long and wonderful phone conversation with Lindsey about her company and I want to share some of the information and products with you! I tried to keep it short but there is just so much great stuff, and I also wanted to share some of my research on the products ingredients with you as well. Feel free to skim or to get in depth with us as I share with you about Joylin Naturals.


About Joylin Naturals

As I mentioned, Lindsey is the co-founder of this amazing company. She and her mother started researching non-toxic products to help with her mother’s autoimmune disease. This blossomed into a full on business, where they began finding the highest quality organic ingredients possible to create their products.


Lindsey shared with me that they specialize in helping people develop a skin care routine based on issues they are having with their skin. If you are interested in having them help pick out some products for you, just shoot them a message or check out this page on their site for their suggestions based on your skin type.


About Their Organic Ingredients

Joylin sources their ingredients from organic growers around the world and works with a lab to ensure they are pure, with no added chemicals or ingredients. This ensures high-quality and effective products.

Because there are many products out there that are certified organic but still have a bunch or crap in them, she didn’t want to align herself with those other products, and trusts that you will see the quality and benefits of the products when you try them. I know I did!


They also try to limit the amount of ingredients in their products for simplicity and the best impact. When serums have dozens and dozens of ingredients and oils, they start to negate each other’s effects. Joylin ingredient lists are simple and use all grade a ingredients to provide the desired results.


Lindsey's Favorite Products

I asked her for 3 of her favorite products, but she couldn’t limit it down to 3, which I totally understand after using them! Here are some of her suggested products for you to try if you are new to Joylin!


The Charcoal Face Bar. It lasts for forever and you can read my more in depth review on it below.Blueberry Oil. She uses this when her face feels dry, and I also go more in depth on this as well.Age Defying Serum. Lindsey says you can almost feel the vitamin C soaking into your skin. It has hyaurlonic acid and green coffee bean oil to help prevent wrinkling and skin aging.Tamanu Butter. She likes to slather this on her face at night for a mask. This was also one of my favs!


What We Have to Look Forward to From Joylin Naturals

Joylin has plans to expand their oil line significantly, focusing on the cold pressed butters and oils. Some of the other exciting new products are Argan Butter, Marine Creme and the Black Magic Mask, which will feature activated charcoal and rose water.


Lindsey is also working on an “intention based” line. Although it is not finalized, this will feature products like essential oil room sprays with crystals in them and essential oil blends.

I also wanted to share with you my experience using some of Joylin’s products, their benefits and other great info on them!


Organic Tamanu Butter


Okay guys, this has got to be my favorite product by far. This butter originates from the nut kernel of the Tamanu Tree, and Joylin sources theirs out of Southeast Asia. It is naturally a beautiful green color (as you can see in the picture below) and has a nutty smell to it. It is great for sensitive skin and beneficial for scar reduction and hydration.


I love to apply this over one of the oils at night and I wake up with a fully moisturized and refreshed face. They also sell Tamanu Oil at Joylin, which is made out of the same ingredient, just extracted differently. This butter will be a little oilier and better for a winter mask, whereas the tamanu oil will absorb quicker and leave less of a residue.


The research on this butter/oil shows so many amazing skin benefits brought by Tamanu. It is antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, has anticancer properties, helps with scar healing and has even been used in Fiji to treat diaper rash and chapped lips[i],[ii],[iii],[iv].

Organic Emu Oil

At Joylin, they like to refer to Emu Oil as the “miracle oil.” They first discovered this product when searching for something to help with Lindsey’s mom’s autoimmune disease. It helped her mom with arthritis in her hands as well as dry, cracking, red skin.


Lindsey shared with me that it is made out of fat lipids, so it absorbs quickly into the skin and helps with just about anything, form hair regrowth to itching to hormonal acne. You can even use it on your pets to help with itching or coat regeneration! The fatty acid and antioxidant profile of this oil also helps fight free radicals, which often causes the “aged” look that so many people try to avoid[v]. This is most likely why Joylin advertises this for anti-aging.


Most of the research I found on Emu Oil has been done on rats, but they seem to have found a lot of evidence for it to help with decreased inflammation and wound healing[vi],[vii],[viii],[ix]. I only found a few small studies done on humans that have seen results for people with arthritis, so more need to be done to scientifically confirm it[x].


That being said, I love using this oil on my face, and Lindsey’s mom and so many others have seen results from this miracle oil, so it is definitely worth a try!


Lindsey and I also recognize that this oil may cause some concern for those of you that are vegan. The oil comes from an organic, free-range farm in Australia. In Australia, Emu is a common food, and at this farm they use 97% of the bird. They are treated humanely and the birds are not sacrificed for their oil, as their oil is just a byproduct of the process.


Lindsey understands the controversy over it, but because of the healing properties it has and how it has impacted her mother, she believes that the product is necessary to share with others. If you have any questions or concerns about this, please feel free to contact Lindsey at Joylin Naturals or I to discuss.


Organic Blueberry Oil

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Ahhhhh, this oil….it smells just like blueberries and totally hydrates my skin. Blueberry oil is filled with antioxidants like Vitamin E that help protect the skin by preventing and limiting damage done by free radicals[xi]. It absorbs quickly so it doesn’t have a heavy, oily feeling to it.


Joylin Naturals promotes this for anti-aging (again, because of it’s antioxidants) among a host of other benefits.



Organic Charcoal Face Bar

I really have loved this facial cleanser!


I tried my best to find actual research on the skin/detoxification benefits of activated charcoal, since that is often what is advertised as it’s number one benefit, but there wasn’t any out there (that I could find – if you find some, please send it my way!). This really surprised me!


That being said, if a product works well for how it is intended, I won’t let that stop me from using it as long as the ingredients are safe. This face bar gets my skin so clean and really removes all the dirt and grime.

It also harnesses the power of tea tree essential oil, which has been shown to help with inflammation and acne reduction[xii],[xiii],[xiv]. (I also got to try their Tea Tree Essential Oil. I will sometimes add a few drops to the blueberry or emu oil, or use it for spot treatment if needed. This has the same benefits as listed for the face bar).


Organic Purifying Clay Mask


This mask uses simple ingredients like bentonite clay, sea kelp, blue green algae, vitamin E and C, and Himalayan salt. Joylin promotes this product for balancing oil production, detoxifying skin, and skin rejuvenation.


Most of the studies on bentonite clay have to do with internal detoxification and how it absorbs heavy metals, but there weren’t many on it’s skin benefits. I already shared about the antioxidant and anti-aging benefits of Vitamin E earlier, so can’t go wrong there. Marine algae also has compounds that help prevent skin wrinkling and aging[xv].


This product helps remove the excess oil from my skin, and I love the anti-aging benefits!


Personalized Skin Care Regimen

At Joylin Naturals, they want to work with you to give you a personalized skin care regimen based off your skin type or skin issues. Shoot them an email or DM them to get your personalized routine. They have helped people with hives, rashes, cancer patients and more.


Final Thoughts

I cannot recommend this brand enough (as you can probably tell from my overly long post), but it has changed my skin using their products and they are AMAZING!!


Please message me if you have any specific questions about the products I tried or any other related inquiries. I hope this gives you some suggestions of great new products to try! Check them out right now at Joylin Naturals.


Resources

[i] Yimdjo, M C, et al. “Antimicrobial and Cytotoxic Agents from Calophyllum Inophyllum.” Phytochemistry., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2004, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15474565.

[ii] Tsai, SC, et al. “Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Calophyllum Inophyllum L. in RAW264.7 Cells.” Pubmed.gov, Sept. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22735972.

[iii] Kainuma, Mami, et al. “Medicinal Plants of Sandy Shores: A Short Review on Calophyllum Inophyllum and Thespesia Populnea.” Research Gate, 15 Dec. 2016, www.researchgate.net/publication/313248211_Medicinal_Plants_of_Sandy_Shores_A_Short_Review_on_Calophyllum_inophyllum_and_Thespesia_populnea.

[iv] “Tamanu Oil: A Unique Tropical Healing Oil.” ABP, www.abp.com.au/files/Tamanu_Oil___ABP.pdf .

[v] Bennett, Darin C., et al. “Comparison of the Antioxidant Properties of Emu Oil with Other Avian Oils.” Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture, CSIRO PUBLISHING, 11 Sept. 2008, www.publish.csiro.au/an/EA08134.

[vi] Li ZQ, Wang JH, Ren JL, Yi ZH. Effects of topical emu oil on wound healing in scalded rats. Di Yi Jun Yi Da Xue Xue Bao. 2004;24:1255–6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15567771.

[vii] Yoganathan, S, et al. “Antagonism of Croton Oil Inflammation by Topical Emu Oil in CD-1 Mice.” Lipids., U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 2003, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12934669.

[viii] Snowden JM, Whitehouse MW. Anti-inflammatory activity of emu oils in rats. Inflammopharmacology. 1997;5:127–32. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17694361.

[ix] Lindsay RJ, Geier MS, Yazbeck R, Butler RN, Howarth GS. Orally administered emu oil decreases acute inflammation and alters selected small intestinal parameters in a rat model of mucositis. Br J Nutr. 2010;104:513–9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20377926.

[x] Leahey, Thom. “DOUBLE BLIND PLACEBO-CONTROLLED STUDY USING EMU OIL AND MINERAL OIL.” Emu Oil, EmuOil.us, www.emuoil.us/oil/dbpc-emuvsmineral.

[xi] Parry, J, et al. “Fatty Acid Composition and Antioxidant Properties of Cold-Pressed Marionberry, Boysenberry, Red Raspberry, and Blueberry Seed Oils.” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 9 Feb. 2005, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15686403.

[xii] Carson, C. F., et al. “Melaleuca Alternifolia (Tea Tree) Oil: a Review of Antimicrobial and Other Medicinal Properties.” Clinical Microbiology Reviews, American Society for Microbiology, Jan. 2006, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1360273/.

[xiii] Bassett, I B, et al. “A Comparative Study of Tea-Tree Oil versus Benzoylperoxide in the Treatment of Acne.” The Medical Journal of Australia., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 15 Oct. 1990, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2145499?itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=1.

[xiv] Enshaieh, S, et al. “The Efficacy of 5% Topical Tea Tree Oil Gel in Mild to Moderate Acne Vulgaris: a Randomized, Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study.” Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology., U.S. National Library of Medicine, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17314442?itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=1.

[xv] Thomas, Noel Vinay, and Se-Kwon Kim. “Beneficial Effects of Marine Algal Compounds in Cosmeceuticals.” National Center for Biotechnology Information, 14 Jan. 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3564164/.